Food & Drink

Oita Fukae
Oita’s 774km long coastline is lined with fishing ports, both great and small, but only a few have a fish market. One exception is at Fukae, in Hiji on the Kunisaki Peninsula, a sleepy fishing village.

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Oita doburokumaturi
Visitors to Ota, a usually quiet village on the Kunisaki Peninsula, swell the local population by a factor of 30 or more over two days in mid-October when its popular Doburoku Festival is held. With a history stretching back to 710 A. D.

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The people of Oita Prefecture are reputed to eat more chicken meat than of any other prefecture in Japan. Two particularly popular chicken dishes are Toriten and Karaage.

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A moreish noodle dish, available either as cold reimen or hot onmen, heralding from Beppu.

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Dango-jiru is one of Oita’s signature dishes. Kneaded, thick wheat noodles cooked with sliced shiitake mushrooms, onions and carrots in a miso soup make this a simple, yet delicious and filling dish. The same noodles used in Dango-jiru are the substance in Yaseuma.

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Oita Shochu v2
Although lesser known overseas, shochu, a refined vodka-like beverage that is made from a variety of sources including sweet potato, molasses and rice, is as widely drunk in Japan as sake.

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At a glance

Mugi-jochu, a refined wheat vodka, is Oita's version of Kyushu's famed shochu tipple.

Oita Sake
Commonly known in Japan as nihonshu, sake, which is fermented from rice, is widely recognised around the world as a distinctly Japanese drink.

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At a glance

The popular libation to the kami, Japan's gods.

Oita Fugu
Fugu blowfish is a peculiarly Japanese delicacy known as much for its delicious taste as its potential deadly side effects if prepared by the unqualified chef. Usuki, with nearly 20 speciality restaurants, ranks as a major destination for lovers of fugu.

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Oita Ukai
200 years ago the then daikan, the shogun’s representative in Hita, brought the ancient art of ukai cormorant fishing to Kyushu from Edo, the old name for Tokyo.

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Oita Tomaya
To cross the threshold of Tomaya in Kitsuki is to go back in time. The current building, a delightfully quaint tea emporium, dates to 1875 but the business was first established in the mid-Edo Period (1603~1868).

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Oita Tajmaya
Not only does Tajimaya produce the best wagashi confectionary in Oita, its delicious products undoubtedly count amongst the best in Japan.

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At a glance

An elegant, traditional Japanese shop that has been making and selling delightful wagashi Japanese sweets since 1804.

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Introduced to Japan in the 19th Century, beer has long been the nation’s favourite tipple and today accounts for approximately two-thirds of alcohol consumption.

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At a glance

Visit Sapporo's Hita brewery to learn about the origins of the company and to savour some of Japan's classic beers.

Oita Saiki sushi
Any gourmet passionate about fish has to make the journey to Saiki, which boasts the widest range of fresh fish found anywhere in Japan.

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Oita Mitchinoeki
Michi-no-eki wayside stations are a popular institution in Japan and, with 24 of them, Oita Prefecture has more than its fair share. Locals proudly run these shops, akin to idiosyncratic convenience stores on steroids, selling a large variety of produce and dishes from the immediate area.

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Oita Jigokumushi
In Beppu’s Kannawa district steam derived from volcanic activity deep below the earth seems to rise up from every crevice in the ground. Onsen baths are plentiful here but a lesser known attraction is jigoku-mushi steamed cooking.

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Oita Ajimu winery
Top grade grapes for the table are grown widely in Kyushu and are a staple fruit during the summer months. Grapes for viticulture, the production of wine, are, however, much rarer in the region.

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